English I
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For Today's Class:
Attention! Please view Canvas-Modules to access class and assignments.
Scroll down for
the agenda.
This page is meant to assist with the class, not to substitute
for the class. Updates are usually made after 8 P.M.
Legend:
EQ=Essential Question
SQ=Supporting Question
H=Handout
HW=Homework
WN=Writer's Notebook
ESOL Strategies/ ESOL Strategies
Strategies Matrix in website
The Standards The highlighted
standards are the extremely important
ones addressed in my class.
Click for additional
information.
                                  This is an overview of the daily classwork. Please go through Canvas-Modules to access the course.

                                                                                                                          
   May
Essential Questions:  How does a person develop a sense of right and wrong? What is the role of a person’s family and community in their moral development?
How do expectations around race, gender, and class shape the way that people see themselves and the world around them?
How do different people respond when faced with injustice?
  Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Remember that you have a
resource page for
To Kill a
Mockingbird
here:
To Kill a Mockingbird

Standards
Determine the meaning of
words and phrases as
they are used in a text,
including figurative and
connotative meanings;
analyze the impact of
specific word choices on
meaning and tone,
including analogies or
allusions to other texts.
Analyze the extent to which
a filmed or live production
of a story or drama stays
faithful to or departs from
the text or script, evaluating
the choices made by the
director or actors.
Analyze how particular
lines of dialogue or
incidents in a story or
drama propel the action,
reveal aspects of a
character, or provoke a
decision.
4
Go to your Modules in
Canvas
I. Warm Up
A. Read
Point of View
and Lesson Guidance
B. Respond to Prompt
#16  Point of View
See Canvas (Core and
Honors)
One of the most famous
lines in
To Kill a
Mockingbird
 (Links to an
external site.)is when
Atticus tells Scout, “You
never really understand a
person until you consider
things from his point of
view—until you climb into
his skin and walk around
in it" (Chapter 3, page 16).

What does this line reveal
about Atticus? Select one
additional piece of
evidence from the text that
helps to support your
answer, then explain it
and elaborate.
Remember, do not write
"This quote shows, or
this means..." because I
am grading how the
writer thinks, not the
quote.

C.
Discussion Honors
Only
See Modules
C.
Quiz Part 2 Core Only
See
Modules
II. Reading and Listening
To Kill a Mockingbird
(this is a different version)
Chapters 6 through 11
from TK
AM (Core and
Honors, and listen to
them here:
Audio of
TKAM Chapters 6 to
11.
5
6
7
8
This week's work is
due.
Prompt List:
1. Resolutions
2. Dreams
3. WWDKD
4. Shoe Tree
5. Hero
6. Time
7. Right of Wrong
8. Images
9 Masks
10. Argumentative
11. Comma, Semicolon,
Colon, Apostrophe
11 Honors and Core
I. Warm Up
    A. Find Writer's
    Notebook,
    Prompts 1 to 11
    (Teams Meeting
    Wednesday for
    some periods,
    some the next
    day, for about 60
    minutes).
    B. Choose two (2)
    prompts to share
    aloud with peers
    and have it ready
    for tomorrow.  (15
    points total)
    C. Prompt #17
    Brave
What does it mean to be
"brave"?
How does Atticus’s
comment about Mrs.
Dubose on page 61 (at
the very end of Part I of
the novel), “She was the
bravest person I ever
knew,” reveal aspects of
his character? Explain
your thinking and provide
one additional piece of
evidence from the text that
supports your answer.

II. Assignments
A. Read Chapters 12 to
15 from
To Kill a
Mockingbird and listen to
it if
you need an extra
resource.
1. Follow Modules in
Canvas
--Modules for Honors
--Modules for Core

    Don't forget to
    check Pinnacle
    Gradebook (and
    read the Narrative
    there to make
    sure that you
    followed the
    instructions).

    Also, don't forget
    that there is a
    resource for
    deeper
    understanding of
    the novel at http:
    //reyeseng.
    org/Mockingbird.
    html
12  


Notes:
1.  It is imperative that you speak in Language Arts.
2. Instructions for Team Meeting will be posted and Pinnacle
Assignments will be posted on 5/11
13
Honors:
I. Warm Up
A. Periods 1 and 4 will Log on to Teams Meeting at 9 A.M. see
Canvas for Meeting Link.
Periods 6 and 7 will Log onto Teams Meeting at 11 A.M. (5 pts
for attendance, 10 for each prompt read). Follow the link
provided to you in Modules in Canvas
1. Writer's Notebook Reading from two Prompts 1 to 11.
a. If you miss this meeting a Makeup Assignment will be
attached for you to complete through Canvas.

IF YOU MISSED THE MEETING YOUR MAKEUP
ASSIGNMENT IS UP IN CANVAS.

Core:

Many of you owe many assignments. PLEASE get on with
the course. EACH assignment in Pinnacle comes with
explanations and links (check the Narrative).

Follow Modules in Canvas.
14
Continue with previous days' work.
15
Continue with previous
days' work.

Turn in assignments with
due dates (see Pinnacle
for due dates).

It is understood that at
least two assignments
per week are given with
reading from
To Kill a Mockingbird,
and the assignments will
be due today.
In the Jim Crow South,
almost every aspect of
a person’s life was
determined by his or
her race (as well as
class and gender).
Challenging or
subverting norms of
race could have
serious—even
deadly—
consequences.
People’s perceptions
of others are often
strongly influenced by
bias, prejudice, and
stereotypes. It can be
challenging to
“unlearn” these beliefs.
It is important to extend
generosity and
empathy to all people
to understand why
they make the choices
they do, even as we
take a stand against
the injustice they may
perpetrate.
18 ***This information
is also on Canvas***

I.
Warm Up
A. Review Chapter 15
of
To Kill a
Mockingbird, in this
link it is pages 76 to
82.
Listen to these pages
here>>
Audio
(the audio is divided
into three parts, see
the same page for all
three parts).
B. Read
Chapters 16
to 20
(pages 82 to
110) to gain insight
on where the plot is
going after reviewing
Chapter 15. Listen to
chapter 16 here;
there are three parts:
TKAM CH 16, Part 1,
Part 2,
Part 3.
(scroll down for each
part).

II.
Homework

A.. Tomorrow
(Tuesday), at 1:00 P.
M, there will be a
Team Meeting to
discuss the chapter.
Be there! Click on the
link. Be on Video, if
possible have notes. I
will post questions for
about two minutes
and then go question
by question for a
good and quick chat
(meaning, everyone is
expected to
participate via speech
AND/OR chat). I would
like to share my
screen with you for a
presentation, that is
why Zoom is best.
Link will be posted by
0800 A.M. tomorrow.
All you need to do is
read and take notes.
To help you, use any
of the annotation
examples that have
been provided.  The
objective is to explain
how specific incidents
and lines of dialogue
reveal aspects of
characters and propel
the action of To Kill a  
Mockingbird.Make
use of what you have
learned  Literary
Analysis and take
notes with any of the
following tools :  
Chapter 15.pdf
Text/Me
Notes Charts

    Objective for
    the Meet:
Explain how specific
incidents and lines of
dialogue reveal
aspects of characters
and propel the action
of
To Kill a
Mockingbird.
19
I.
Warm Up
See Canvas Modules and follow the
instructions for Zoom. I cannot post them here.
A. Log onto Zoom we will discuss Chapter 15. Have a
page of notes (back and front).
All classess time 1:00 P.M.
20
Make Up for yesterday's meeting.

If you did not present yourself during the meeting on
Tuesday at 1 P.M. this assignment is for you. If you
were at the meeting, however, no, you cannot do this
assignment, and if you do, I will not grade it. Only
students who missed the meeting can complete this
assignment.

Go back to Chapter 15 on page 76. Look for the
passage that begins: “All right, Mr. Finch, get ’em
outa here . . . . ”
The passage then ends with: “Doors slammed,
engines coughed, and they were gone.”

You should be looking for all of the details that
concern how Scout reacts to the mob, then look for
all of the details of how Mr. Cunningham behaves
and what makes him and his men leave.

By clicking on Submit Assignment (above), answer
the following questions. Remember to include
evidence from the text and to explain and elaborate
on your response. Lastly, check your writing:

1. In writing, create a step by step recording of Scout’
s efforts to make a connection with Mr. Cunningham.
What do these efforts from Scout reveal about her
character?

2. Now reread the passage a second time. What
clues are shown about Mr. Cunningham that might
explain his eventual decision to leave the jail and
take the rest of the men with him?

3. What does Harper Lee show us with the incident at
the jailhouse, and how does she suggest that mob
mentality can be defeated?

Lastly, submit your notes to the Chapter 15 Live
Discussion.

Prompt #18 Mockingbird

Answer the following questions to the best of your
ability, your response is a reflection, therefore, there
is no need for a quote from the text.

1. What secret does Dolphus Raymond reveal to
Scout and Dill outside the courthouse? How does this
revelation change the way they think of him? What is
Dolphus Raymond's explanation for why he
“deliberately perpetuates a fraud against himself”?
What does Dill learn from him?


2. Why does Raymond think that children like Scout
and Dill can understand his secret better than adults?


3. According to Raymond, how will growing up
change Scout and Dill? What will they gain and what
will they lose as they get older? Do you think he’s
right?
21

There is no school on Monday. I am not sure what
that means, but for those of you who have already
taken time off, and need to catch up, you know there
is only one week of school left. :-

Soooo, get it done!  We are almost there!

By Tuesday then, you will have to read five chapters
after responding to Prompt #18. Follow the Modules.
Then, respond to the handout that is in the
assignment previous page.

Read Chapters 21 to 25, pages 110 to 128  
here  
and you can listen to it here (
Audio)

Don't forget that you can view additional information
for better understanding at  
Mockingbird.

HONORS ONLY
Redneck Ewells Worksheet
First, read handouts 5.5 and 5.6 to be able to fill out
the chart (this is in Canvas, which I cannot post here).
Turn in via Canvas submission.
Click on the worksheet in Canvas  for the chart you
will fill out regarding Bob and Mayella Ewell.
22
Ancillary to To Kill a
Mockingbird:
Caged Bird by Maya
Angelou

How does Angelou's
poem resemble Lee's
novel?
  25
No School-Memorial Day!
26
Prompt #19  Other People's Perspectives
Choose ONLY one question from below to discuss:

Atticus repeatedly reminds his children to consider
other people’s perspectives. In  Chapter 16, referring
to the night in front of the jail house, he tells his
children that they “made Walter Cunningham stand in
my shoes for a minute. That was enough.” Is Atticus
right? Is it “enough” to consider things from the
perspective of others? Will that always connect us in
moments of conflict? Was this conflict solved, or was
it just deferred? Support your answer with evidence
from the text.

                                                                                  
or

What factors influence our moral growth? What kinds
of experiences help us learn how to judge right from
wrong? You may use the novel as a basis for your
response.
27

Two good sources that provide additional information
about what our nation has been through and what it
has been built on. DO NOT FORGET this when our
politicians forget.

Without Sanctuary

The Origins of Lynching Culture in the United States.

Lastly, some more updated information:

Featuring the work of Northeastern University School
of Law's Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project
(CRRJ), "The Trouble I've Seen" follows the
investigations of three harrowing civil rights cold
cases. Founded by Professor Margaret Burnham,
CRRJ takes on cases that both horrify us and beg us
to correct the record, to search for reconciliation and
remediation for families and communities that even
decades later shudder in the shadows of bigotry and
injustice. "The Trouble I've Seen" is narrated by
Julian Bond, former chairman of the NAACP.

The Trouble I've Seen


Read To Kill a Mockingbird, Chapters 26 to 31,
Listen Here.
28
Prompt # 20 Respond to The New York Times:
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/22/learning/do-you-
prefer-to-dwell-
in-the-past-live-in-
the-present-or-dream-of-the-future.
html

See Modules in Canvas
Horton Hears a Hoot
People are People


Was the killing of Ahmaud Arbery justified? Is any
killing justified?
Justified?
Killing of a Jogger
Lynchings Continue
And again it happened!
Why do we have to go through this?
Don't forget to pay attention to what happens to the
dog.

Practice Grammar:
Grammar Practice
29
  1 June
2 June   Last Day of School